Bupropion: Uses, Doses & Side Effects

Bupropion is used to treat seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and can also be used to help patients stop smoking.

Bupropion is an antidepressant that is used to treat a variety of depressive disorders. It will help increase certain activities in the brain which will help alleviate the negative feelings that are associated with depression. This medication can be prescribed for short or long term use based on the condition that is being addressed. You will need to work with your doctor to determine what type of dosing and treatment is most appropriate for you.

Indications and Usage

Bupropion is sold under the brand names Aplenzin, Budeprion XL,Budeprion SR, Buproban, Wellbutrin SR, Wellbutrin, Wellbutrin XL and Zyban. These medications are available in 12 and 24 hour release tablets, extended release tablets and standard tablets. This medication is mainly used to help treat seasonal affective disorder or SAD, but it can also be used to treat depression or to help patients quit smoking. Doses are usually taken 3-4 times a day or at least 6 hours with at least one dose in the morning. Regardless of what condition that you are taking bupropion for, you should take this medication for at least 2 weeks in order to ensure that your condition has time to react to your medication.

Bupropion Dosage

Because bupropion is available from many different companies, your dosing will probably vary based on the product you have been given. Read the instructions on your prescription to make sure that you get all the information you need to take your dose effectively.

If you are using the standard dosing of bupropion, you will usually be given 174-522 mg per day of Aplenzin, 450 mg per day of Forfivo and 150-450 mg of Wellbutrin. If you are treating seasonal affective disorder, you will be given 174-522 mg per day of Aplenzin or 150-300 mg per day of Wellbutrin XL. When treating depression, patients are given 150-200 mg per day. Those using bupropion to help them quit smoking will be given 150 mg for three days, which will then be increased up to 300 mg as necessary.

Table 1: Bupropion Dosage

Indications

Usual Dosage

Special Dosage

Standard dosing

Aplenzin: 174-522 mg per day

Forfivo: 450 mg per day

Wellbutrin: 150 mg in the morning, adjusted up to 450 mg per day

Children's dose should be determined by your doctor

Seasonal affective disorder

Aplenzin: 174 mg per day in the morning, increased up to 522 mg per day

Wellbutrin XL: 150 mg per day, increased up to 300 mg per day

Children's doses should be determined by your doctor

Depression

150 mg per day, increased up to 200 mg per day as necessary

Children will based their dosing on your doctor's advice

Quitting Smoking

150 mg per day for three days, then increased up to 300 mg as necessary

 

Bupropion Side Effects

Side effects of bupropion include agitation which is reported in 31.9 percent of users, weight loss in 28 percent, dry mouth in 27.6 percent of users, constipation in 26 percent, headaches in 25.7 percent, nausea or vomiting in up to 22.9 percent of users, dizziness in 22.3 percent, increased sweating in 22.3 percent, shakiness in 21.1 percent, insomnia in 18.6 percent, appetite loss in 18.3 percent, blurred vision in 14.6 percent, rapid heart rate in 10.8 percent, confusion in 8.4 percent, hostility in 5.6 percent, irregular heart rhythm in 5.3 percent and hearing changes in 5.3 percent of users. These side effects are not necessarily dangerous, but you should report any reactions to your medication to your doctor to be sure.

Less common side effects of bupropion, occurring in 1-5 percent of users, include hypertension, menstrual problems, forcefully beating heart, indigestion, low blood pressure, increased appetite, anxiety, arthritis, impotence, decreased libido, taste changes and fainting. These side effects are also not dangerous but you may wish to report any changes to your doctor to ensure that you are not developing a potentially dangerous condition.

Rare side effects of bupropion include hair loss, ulcers, acne, canker sores, mood swings, bronchitis, low or high blood pressure, flushing, memory loss or bladder infections. Let your doctor know if you develop any of these conditions, but do not stop taking your medication unless instructed.

If you begin to develop seizures, suicidal thoughts, chest palpitations, anxiety, extreme elation, hostility, aggressiveness, engaging in dangerous activities, fast heart rate, restlessness, unusual changes in behavior, hallucinations, difficulty sleeping or internal jitteriness, you are at risk for developing a severe reaction to bupropion. Contact your doctor as soon as possible to get help. In the case that your side effects make you feel as though your life is at risk contact emergency medical services. If you are concerned about suicidal thoughts or actions, ask your doctor for a phone number for a hotline that you can call to get assistance.

Table 2: Bupropion Side Effects

Types of Side Effects

Symptoms

Common Side Effects

Agitation, weight loss, dry mouth, constipation, headaches, nausea, dizziness, increased sweating, shakiness, insomnia, appetite loss, blurred vision, rapid heart rate, confusion, hostility, irregular heart rhythm, and hearing changes.

Uncommon Side Effects

Hypertension, menstrual problems, forcefully beating heart, indigestion, low blood pressure, increased appetite, anxiety, arthritis, impotence, decreased libido, taste changes and fainting.

Rare Side Effects

Hair loss, ulcers, acne, canker sores, mood swings, bronchitis, low or high blood pressure, flushing, memory loss or bladder infections.

Serious Side Effects

Seizures, suicidal thoughts, chest palpitations, anxiety, extreme elation, hostility, aggressiveness, engaging in dangerous activities, fast heart rate, restlessness, unusual changes in behavior, hallucinations, difficulty sleeping or internal jitteriness.

Interactions

Medications that have been reported to negatively interact with bupropion include medications that prevent blood clots, medications used to treat cancer, blood pressure medication, heart medication, HIV and AIDS medication. These can cause your body to fail to absorb bupropion the way it should, which will negatively impact your overall condition.

Some medications may increase your risk of developing seizures when combined with bupropion. These medications include antidepressants, antihistamines, asthma medications, birth control pills, bladder or urinary medications, antibiotics, diet pills, insulin, nausea medications, medication for Parkinson's disease, medications used in organ transplants, narcotics, sedatives, steroids, theophylline and ulcer medications. Inform your doctor if you are taking these or any other medications regularly so that they can determine if you are at risk for developing a negative reaction to your medication.

You should not use illegal drugs or alcohol while using bupropion. These substances will also increase your risk of developing seizures when combined with this medication.

You should not use bupropion to treat more than one condition at the same time. If you have already been prescribed bupropion, let your doctor know so they can offer you an alternative medication for any other conditions that you have. Otherwise you run the risk of mistreating your condition or developing severe side effects.

Bupropion may cause your reaction time to become impaired. You should not drive or do anything that requires your full attention until you know how this medication will affect you personally.

Recommended:

What Is Trazodone?

Trazodone is used to treat depression and other mental disorders caused by a serotonin imbalance. Know its effects. side effects, interactions and more!


Current time: 09/20/2017 05:17:43 am (America/New_York) Memory usage: 4734.27KB